The Voyage And Shipwreck Of Paul As Related By Luke. A Commentary On Acts 27:1-44; 28:16. -- By: H. B. Hackett

Journal: Bibliotheca Sacra
Volume: BSAC 007:28 (Oct 1850)
Article: The Voyage And Shipwreck Of Paul As Related By Luke. A Commentary On Acts 27:1-44; 28:16.
Author: H. B. Hackett


The Voyage And Shipwreck Of Paul As Related By Luke. A
Commentary On Acts 27:1-44; 28:16.

Prof. H. B. Hackett

Departure From Caesarea And Arrival At Myra, Vs. 1-5

Verse 1. ἐκρίθη relates to the time of departure, not to the decision itself that they should be sent. — ἡμᾶς. It will be observed that the historian is one of the party. The plural of the pronoun was last used in 21:18. παρεδίδουν is not so vague as the third person plural impersonal (see St. § 174; Win. § 49. 1), but expresses the idea more concretely: they delivered, i.e. those who acted in this case under the command of the procurator. —ἑτέρους, additional prisoners, not different in character from Paul, L e. heathen, as Meyer supposes. Luke

uses that term and ἄλλους indiscriminately; see 15:35. 17:34. —σπείρης Σεβαστῆς of the Augustan cohort Ii is well established that there were several legions in the Roman army at this time, which bore the above title. No ancient writer, however, mentions that any one of them was stationed in the East. Some critics suppose, notwithstanding the absence of any notice to this effect, that such may have been the fact, and that one of the cohorts belonging to this legion, and distinguished by the same name, bad its quarters at Caesarea, The more, general opinion is that the Roman cohorts, instead of being incorporated always with a particular legion, existed often separately; and that such an independent cohort was now at Caesarea, known as the Augustan or imperial, because with reference to its relation to the procurator it corresponded in some sense to the emperor’s life-guard at Rome. It was identical, in all probability, with the Italian cohort mentioned in 8:1, which was so called because it consisted chiefly of Italians or Romans, while the other cohorts at Caesarea, as stated by Josephus (Antt. 20, 8. 7; 19, 9. 2) were made up, to a great extent, of Caesareans, or Samaritans. It is on account of this last circumstance that some explain σπείρης Σεβαστῆς as meaning Sebastenean or Samaritan cohort, since the city of Samaria bore also the Greek name Σεβαστή in honor of the emperor Augustus. But in that case, as Winer,You must have a subscription and be logged in to read the entire article.
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