Notes On Dr. Riddle’s Edition Of Robinson’s Harmony Of The Gospels: Being A Contribution To A Complete Harmony Of The Gospels -- By: Charles Leaman

Journal: Bibliotheca Sacra
Volume: BSAC 046:183 (Jul 1889)
Article: Notes On Dr. Riddle’s Edition Of Robinson’s Harmony Of The Gospels: Being A Contribution To A Complete Harmony Of The Gospels
Author: Charles Leaman


Notes On Dr. Riddle’s Edition Of Robinson’s Harmony Of The Gospels: Being A Contribution To A Complete Harmony Of The Gospels

Rev. Charles Leaman

The Appearance To The Women

Another quite necessary change from Robinson’s order of arrangement is in the appearance to the women. (See Editor’s note.)

In no portion of the harmony is it more necessary to follow what is suggested, by taking the accounts in their natural sense and giving the testimony of each account its full and strict independent value, than in this portion. By following these suggestions the account of Luke 24:1–9 does not appear to be a giving of an account of the same party of women, or of the same visit to the tomb, as that of Matt, 28:1–7 and Mark 16:1–8. Neither is it best to put this visit spoken of by Luke after the appearance to Mary Magdalene (Editor),—for both parties were very early at the tomb, and most probably very near the same time, and with scarcely a doubt, both before Peter and John. Mark says, “very early they come to the tomb; “Matthew, “as it began to dawn;” Luke,” at early dawn, they came unto the tomb/’ Although from this it seems evident that they came unto the tomb about the same time, yet it is not necessary to suppose that they came together, or that they met at the tomb, or before or after. The account of Luke indicates strongly that the

appearance he is narrating is a different one from that given by Matthew and Mark; and the differences are so many and so marked, except in time, that, with all the other incidental confirmations, it is by far most probable, that they arrived, and saw separate visions of angels, in quick succession, on that first and great day of the new creation, at that early dawn; and went severally to make their independent reports to the astonished disciples: Mary Magdalene, without seeing the vision, when she first saw the stone was removed and tomb empty; then the other Mary and Salome would shortly see the vision, and run speechless; and then, following shortly, the other women came, and saw another vision, and, with quite a different message, returned, and told all these things unto the eleven and to all the rest. None have yet seen the Lord, as is evident from the record of Luke of the appearance to the two disciples, who left Jerusalem “probably early in the afternoon.” (Andrews.) These two disciples said that “certain women......had also seen a vision of angels, and certain of them that were with us went to the tomb, and found it even so as the women had said: but him they saw not. “If, then, the party of...

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