An Integration Of Biblical Theology And Some Tools Of Discourse Analysis: Hebrews 8:6-13 As A Case Study -- By: Melton B. Winstead

Journal: Christian Apologetics Journal
Volume: CAJ 12:1 (Spring 2014)
Article: An Integration Of Biblical Theology And Some Tools Of Discourse Analysis: Hebrews 8:6-13 As A Case Study
Author: Melton B. Winstead


An Integration Of Biblical Theology And Some Tools Of Discourse Analysis:
Hebrews 8:6-13 As A Case Study

Melton B. Winstead

While Heb. 8:6-13 might not have the elevated style per se as does much of the rest Hebrews, the author used certain structural tools that call for analysis and interpretation. Additionally, the sheer fact that Heb. 8:8-12 comprises the longest direct quote of the Old Testament in the New Testament gives impetus for a consideration of biblical theology in tandem with the theology of the epistle. It seems the new covenant is of vital importance for the author1 to discuss as he2 attempts to demonstrate Christ’s superiority over various and sundry OT ordinances and sacrifices, etc. Finally, the uses of the OT, specifically,

the structure, contexts, and particular OT passages used will be compared / contrasted with those of the epistles traditionally assumed to be Paul’s (i.e., Romans‒Philemon).3

Structural Analysis / Macrostructure4

A Recent History Of Views On The Structure Of Hebrews

Vanhoye

Albert Vanhoye, in his Structure and Message to the Epistle to the Hebrews, made this statement: “A systematic study of the Greek text of the Epistle to the Hebrews has led me to the conclusion that the author of the Epistle has structured his work with great care and has made use of fixed literary devices to indicate what he has done.”5 Vanhoye sees the following literary devices used by AH to structure the latter’s writing: (1) announcement of the subject,6 (2) inclusion, (3) hook words, (4) characteristic terms, (5) alternation in the use of literary genres,7 and (6) symmetrical arrangements.8 This last feature plays prominently in the section with which we are concerned, 8:1-9:28. Vanhoye observes six subdivisions in this larger section that mutually

correspond two by two in a concentric order. In summation, Vanhoye’s outline of the epistle would look like the following: I. The first announcement of the subject (1:4), followed by the first section (You must have a subscription and be logged in to read the entire article.
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