New Creation Theology In 2 Corinthians 5:11-6:2 -- By: Dan Lioy

Journal: Conspectus
Volume: CONSPECTUS 17:1 (Mar 2014)
Article: New Creation Theology In 2 Corinthians 5:11-6:2
Author: Dan Lioy


New Creation Theology In 2 Corinthians 5:11-6:2

Dan Lioy1

Abstract

This analytical essay deals with the theme of new creation theology in 2 Corinthians 5:11-6:2. The major premise is that new creation theology is a defining characteristic in Paul’s teaching. The biblical and theological analysis of this passage indicates that the Lord Jesus is the beginning, middle, and culmination for all of physical and spiritual reality. More specifically, Paul disclosed that the Son’s atoning sacrifice at Calvary makes reconciliation possible between the Creator and repentant, believing sinners. In turn, the Messiah’s redemptive work has inaugurated a new era in which the conversion of individual believers is part of God’s larger plan to bring about the renewal of the entire universe, concluding with the new heavens and new earth.

1. Introduction

This analytical essay deals with the theme of new creation theology in 2 Corinthians 5:11-6:2.2 The major premise is that new creation theology

is a defining characteristic in Paul’s teaching. To contextualize the treatise, section 2 broaches the concept of new creation theology within the Pauline corpus. Next, section 3 summarises what Genesis 1-3 reveals about the old, Adamic creation. Then, in section 4, additional background information from other relevant Old Testament passages and extra-canonical Jewish writings, is presented. Together, these two sections help to establish the narrative framework and theological context from which emerges Paul’s discussion of salvation history in 2 Corinthians 5:11-6:2, the latter being the focus of section 5. This is followed by the Conclusion in section 6, which synthesizes and elucidates the major findings of the discourse.

2. The Concept Of New Creation Theology Within The Pauline Corpus

Smith (2012) identifies the ‘mission of God’ as a key ‘unifying theme of Scripture’ (28). He further clarifies that the missio Dei encompasses God’s redemptive activity ‘across time’ to ‘reconcile all people’ (112) to himself (referred to as ‘salvation history’ or Heilsgeschichte in German) and his efforts to reestablish his ‘righteous and benevolent reign over all creation’ (referred to as the ‘kingdom of God’). In their deliberation about the ‘mission of God’, O’Brien and Harris (2012:147-8) go further when they reason that th...

You must have a subscription and be logged in to read the entire article.
Click here to subscribe
visitor : : uid: ()