Jewish Intertestamental And Early Rabbinic Literature: An Annotated Bibliographic Resource Updated (Part 1) -- By: David W. Chapman

Journal: Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society
Volume: JETS 55:2 (Jun 2012)
Article: Jewish Intertestamental And Early Rabbinic Literature: An Annotated Bibliographic Resource Updated (Part 1)
Author: David W. Chapman


Jewish Intertestamental And Early Rabbinic Literature: An Annotated Bibliographic Resource Updated (Part 1)

David W. Chapman

and Andreas J. Köstenberger

David Chapman is associate professor of New Testament and Archaeology at Covenant Theological Seminary, 12330 Conway Road, St. Louis, MO 63141. Andreas Köstenberger is research professor of New Testament and Biblical Theology at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary, 120 S. Wingate St., Wake Forest, NC 27587.

Twelve years ago we published a bibliography that is now due for a substantial update.1 The field of Jewish literature can be mystifying to the non-specialist. The initial obstacle often is where to go for texts, translations, concordances, and bibliography. Even many researchers more familiar with these materials often fail to take advantage of the best critical texts, translations, and helps currently available. The goal of this article is to summarize in a single location the principal texts, translations, and foundational resources for the examination of the central Jewish literature potentially pertinent to the background study of early Christianity.

Generally, the procedure followed for each Jewish writing is to list the most important works in the categories of: bibliography, critical text, translation, concordance/index, lexical or grammatical aides, introduction, and commentary. Where deemed helpful, more than one work may be included. English translations, introductions, and helps are generally preferred. Most entries are listed alphabetically by author, but bibliographies and texts are typically listed in reverse chronological order from date of publication. Also provided in many instances are the language(s) of extant manuscripts and the likely dates of composition reflecting the current scholarly consensus. While the emphasis is on printed editions, some computer-based resources are noted. Many older printed texts have been scanned and are now available online; we will note when these appear on http://archive.org (often links can also be found through http://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu or http://books.google.com). Space did not permit entries on Samaritan texts or on early Jewish liturgies, papyri, and inscriptions.

1. General Reference Tools (incl. Abbreviations)

1.1 Encyclopedias and Dictionaries

Berenbaum, Michael and Fred Skolnik. Encyclopaedia Judaica. 2d ed.; 22 vols.; Detroit: Macmillan Reference USA and Keter, 2007. Also available

electronically from Gale Virtual Reference Library. A fine substantial update of the original and still useful 16 volume E...

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