The Rhetoric Of Political Discourse In The Labor Movement: Dr. H. Frank Hixson’s Rhetoric Of Reform In Wisconsin In The Nineteenth Century -- By: D. Ray Heisey

Journal: Ashland Theological Journal
Volume: ATJ 38:0 (NA 2006)
Article: The Rhetoric Of Political Discourse In The Labor Movement: Dr. H. Frank Hixson’s Rhetoric Of Reform In Wisconsin In The Nineteenth Century
Author: D. Ray Heisey


The Rhetoric Of Political Discourse In The Labor Movement: Dr. H. Frank Hixson’s Rhetoric Of Reform In Wisconsin In The Nineteenth Century

D. Ray Heisey1

I. Biographical Background of H. Frank Hixson, 1858–1894

Hixson’s Education at Ashland College

Hixson’s Early Life

Hixson was born in southern Ohio on August 8, 1858, the same year as Teddy Roosevelt. In fact, they were similar in personality, in temperament, and in political views. If Hixson had not died so young, he might have aspired to some of the same heights of political office that the young Roosevelt did. Frank Hixson was the second of eight children (the first one and the two immediately following Frank all died in infancy). His parents were Rev. Armanus J. and Martha McClure Hixson of Highland County, Ohio, members of the Dunkard Church. Rev. Armanus Hixson had been one of the early supporters of the new college at Ashland from the beginning which led to Frank’s attendance there.2

Frank Hixson had attended the National Normal School in Lebanon, Ohio, which awarded him an M.A. degree prior to coming to Ashland in 1879. Hixson was the instructor in mathematics for the first several years. His friend, David Bailey, who was also a teacher of mathematics and who also attended lectures and later elected a trustee, writes in his journal for September 19 of that first year, “carpenters are making a lot of noise.”1 The new building was obviously in the finishing stages as the new students arrived on the new campus. Bailey records that there were 55 students enrolled in the fall of 1879 but the following fall term the number had increased to 75.2

Being the oldest son and the first to go to college, Frank was given special opportunity to go to the new Ashland College sponsored by the Brethren Church. His father, as an early supporter of the college, personally was involved and present at the opening of the college. Hixson was enrolled as one of the first students in 1879 and was a member of the first graduating class in 1881.

Ashland College was chartered in 1878 by the Brethren Church and opened its doors as a new college in September 1879. The new students who enrolled and who arrived, were looking “forward with eagerness to the opening day.” One of the histories describes what they saw. “The college building was at the southern edge of town and stood, as it must have appeared, rather lonely though majestically in a large twenty-eight acre field. There were no trees, no lawns, no artistic landscape to appeal t...

You must have a subscription and be logged in to read the entire article.
Click here to subscribe
visitor : : uid: ()