Notes On Dr. Riddle’s Edition Of Robinson’s Harmony Of The Gospels; Being A Contribution To A Complete Harmony Of The Gospels -- By: Charles Leaman

Journal: Bibliotheca Sacra
Volume: BSAC 046:181 (Jan 1889)
Article: Notes On Dr. Riddle’s Edition Of Robinson’s Harmony Of The Gospels; Being A Contribution To A Complete Harmony Of The Gospels
Author: Charles Leaman


Notes On Dr. Riddle’s Edition Of Robinson’s Harmony Of The Gospels; Being A Contribution To A Complete Harmony Of The Gospels

Rev. Charles Leaman

The greatest question of the age, and all ages, is the person and work of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ: to know him in living reality, and the age and circumstances in which he moved, and the relation of him and his age to the rest of lives and ages. To the understanding of this, it is of paramount importance that the life of our Lord, as given in the four Gospels, be put together in harmony, that they may explain and fill out each other, and so give the complete testimony as handed down by the inspired biographers. There have been certain ones since the beginning of the Christian church who have so put the narratives together that they complement each other. One of the last of these laudable efforts appears in the revision of “Robinson’s Harmony of the Gospels,” by Dr. Riddle. In this, the main positions of Robinson, and indeed the text of the harmony, are left unchanged, which shows that a finality is being reached, and gives good promise of a final and complete, at least a generally accepted, harmony of the four Gospels, which will be the kernel of all future lives of Jesus.

It is to contribute to this final result that I offer the following remarks on “A Complete Harmony of the Gospels,”— how far it may be complete, and on what principles determined. Robinson, as his reviser, Dr. Riddle, wisely assumes,

must be taken as the basis; and the few points where completeness demands a change from his arrangement, are what we are to consider. Where Dr. Robinson’s arrangement seems to require changes, we shall endeavor to follow the suggestions of the natural sense of each and all the narratives and, by judicious and careful comparison of all the circumstances, secure that arrangement, which if it does not admit of positive assertion, yet will appear appropriate, probable, and on the whole satisfactory to most, if not all, who are sufficiently interested carefully to examine the evidences.

The Departure Into Galilee

This departure means the one after which Jesus made no visit to Jerusalem for a considerable period, while he formally begins and vigorously prosecutes a ministry of teaching, healing, and itinerating in Galilee. This, evidently, is not the going into Galilee mentioned, John 4:1–3 (Robinson), because “after these things there was the feast of the Jews; and Jesus went up to Jerusalem.” (John 5:1.) It is best to place this important and final departure, with Andrews, after the feast (see editor). This perio...

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