Notes On Dr. Riddle’s Edition Of Robinson’s Harmony Of The Gospels: Being A Contribution To A Complete Harmony Of The Gospels -- By: Charles Leaman

Journal: Bibliotheca Sacra
Volume: BSAC 046:182 (Apr 1889)
Article: Notes On Dr. Riddle’s Edition Of Robinson’s Harmony Of The Gospels: Being A Contribution To A Complete Harmony Of The Gospels
Author: Charles Leaman


Notes On Dr. Riddle’s Edition Of Robinson’s Harmony Of The
Gospels: Being A Contribution To A Complete Harmony Of
The Gospels

Rev. Charles Leaman

[Continued from Vol. 46. p. 94.]

The Visit To Zacchaeus

The next passage where a change from Robinson’s or-der might be made with advantage, is in the order of this visit, which he leaves in the order given by Luke, connecting 9:1 with the healing of the two blind men, and not with the visit. But that the visit to Zacchæus and the parable should come before the healing of blind Bartimaeus, i.e., that Luke 19:1–28 should come before 18:35–43, is most probable from the following reasons:

The external testimony of Matthew and Mark. Mark is the most definite of the Synoptists as to the place and time of the healing. With him Matthew agrees; and of course Luke’s language, which is “less specific” (Riddle), must be explained by them. Their specific statement is that the healing was done “as he went out from Jericho,” “in the way.” The specific statement must be accepted as. it is unless explained further by some more specific statement in another connection. The “general” statement of Luke must be explained, or needs explanation, as far as it seems to conflict with the others. With this direct

and external testimony of Matthew and Mark to the scene and time of the healing, agrees, also, the internal testimony of Luke himself. And, first, Luke 18:35, “as he drew nigh unto Jericho,” is not specific, but Luke speaks “in a general way” (Riddle). In all this portion of Luke (9:51–18:28) he speaks of all the events done in the way, on Jesus’ journey to Jerusalem, with which all statements of time and place are connected in a more or less general way. As Luke draws toward the close of this journey, in his narrative, and speaks of the healing of the blind man, he thinks sufficient to mention it, as the previous events, in connection with the journey, “as he drew nigh” to the city. Not that this necessarily “refers to the first approach to Jericho.” Nothing more can, necessarily, be attached to Luke’s statement, from the general way in which he is speaking of all the events of the journey, than, that Jesus has reached a stage of progress which brings him “nigh” Jericho. Luke does not state the time or manner of Jesus’ approach, or whether the healing occurred when he was going in or out of the city. He had been on this journey, now already, as...

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