The Story Of Ancient Sodom In The Light Of Modern Science—The Xenia Seminary Expedition To The Cities Of The Plain—The Reports Of The Various Members Of The Staff -- By: Anonymous

Journal: Bibliotheca Sacra
Volume: BSAC 081:323 (Jul 1924)
Article: The Story Of Ancient Sodom In The Light Of Modern Science—The Xenia Seminary Expedition To The Cities Of The Plain—The Reports Of The Various Members Of The Staff
Author: Anonymous


The Story Of Ancient Sodom In The Light Of Modern Science—The Xenia Seminary Expedition To The Cities Of The Plain—The Reports Of The Various Members Of The Staff

Arranged By The Editor-In-Chief

Sodom and Gomorrah have been names to conjure with; there has come to be all too much disposition to smile at the mention of these doomed cities, as though their story-was legendary. Criticism has been disposed also boldly to assert that it is so. This account of the story of ancient Sodom in the light of modern science is a narrative of facts that set the old story before us in an entirely new light.

The Xenia Seminary expedition to the Cities of the Plain was arranged in co-operation with the American School of Oriental Research at Jerusalem, and did its work of exploration in the months of February and March, 1924. A staff of specialists in the various phases of the work was assembled. It represented, as will be noticed, various faiths, but all the members were at once scientists and devout men of reverence for the Word, especially the Old Testament with which our work was entirely concerned. The President of the Staff was the President of Xenia Seminary; the Director of field operations was Director Albright of the American School at Jerusalem. These two were the archaeologists of the expedition. Professor Alfred Ely Day, of Beirut College, was the geologist, a man of long experience in Palestine who had already made more than one research journey to the region to be explored. The proto-archaeologist was Pere Mallon, of Ratisbon, Jerusalem, one of the foremost experts in flint and stone lore of Palestine. Mr. Na’im Mekhhouli, a representative of the Department of Antiquities of Palestine, gave a semi-official character to our work, and assisted much with his expert knowledge

of the work in hand and of the language and customs of the people. There were also two Fellows, Rev. Herbert H. Tay, a Fellow of Xenia Seminary and Rev. William Carroll, Thayer Fellow of the American School, and two other students, Mr. Eliezer Sukenik of the American School, who was also our surveyor and collected botanical material, and Rev. Homer B. Kent of Xenia Seminary. We had also the assistance of Mr. Dinsmore of the American Colony, Jerusalem, the most expert Botanist in Palestine. It will be of interest to know that there was the utmost unanimity in conclusions among the members of the Staff and that upon our return to Jerusalem we submitted the principal evidence, that from the pottery, to Pere Vincent, the foremost Palestinian scholar in the world, and to Phythian-Adams, another expert in Palestinian pottery, and they both confirmed the conclusions of the Staff.

We had “a friend at court” in the Em...

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