Part 3 Job and the Nation Israel Third Study: Face to Face with the Lord -- By: Charles Lee Feinberg

Journal: Bibliotheca Sacra
Volume: BSAC 097:386 (Apr 1940)
Article: Part 3 Job and the Nation Israel Third Study: Face to Face with the Lord
Author: Charles Lee Feinberg


Part 3
Job and the Nation Israel
Third Study: Face to Face with the Lord

Charles Lee Feinberg

(Concluded from the January-March Number, 1940)

The Book of Job reveals a victory but it is not the victory of man’s remarkable reasoning, nor the victory of superior argumentation, but the blessed victory of faith (13:15). This triumph was not won in a moment nor by one leap, but in definite and progressive stages. When the last words of Job are given in chapter 31, his friends are still of their opinion and Job is still of his conviction. The problem is deadlocked, as it were. The argument of the book is summarized in 32:1–3. “So these three men ceased to answer Job, because he was righteous in his own eyes. Then was kindled the wrath of Elihu the son of Barachel the Buzite, of the family of Ram: against Job was his wrath kindled, because he justified himself rather than God. Also against his three friends was his wrath kindled, because they had found no answer, and yet had condemned Job.” Then Elihu comes preparing the way for the words of the Lord which follow. We take his words as appropriate because the Lord utters no rebuke of him later. In a sense he is the answer to Job’s burning desire that he might have a Daysman (mochiach, lit. an umpire, arbiter) to stand between God and himself (9:33).

The burden of Elihu’s several addresses is: (1) God is infinitely and eternally greater than man in power. In view of this it behooves man to be in a place of submission before his Creator. (2) God is infinitely greater than man in wisdom. He has no need to detail His ways and plans to man, even if man could understand them (33:13). Man does best when he awaits God’s solution which He alone can give and will give when it pleases him. (3) God is infinitely greater than man in righteousness. “Far be it from God, that he should do wickedness; and from the Almighty, that he should

commit iniquity... Yea, of a surety, God will not do wickedly, neither will the Almighty pervert justice” (34:10, 12). It is impossible for us fully to conceive how sinful it is for us to condemn the righteous and just God, or seek to maintain our righteousness at the expense of His. (4) God is infinitely greater than man in His tender mercy (Jas 5:11). If we could understand the heart of God, we s...

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