Peter And The Prophetic Word: The Theology Of Prophecy Traced Through Peter’s Sermons And Epistles -- By: Paul A. Himes

Journal: Bulletin for Biblical Research
Volume: BBR 21:2 (NA 2011)
Article: Peter And The Prophetic Word: The Theology Of Prophecy Traced Through Peter’s Sermons And Epistles
Author: Paul A. Himes


Peter And The Prophetic Word:
The Theology Of Prophecy Traced Through Peter’s Sermons And Epistles

Paul A. Himes

Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary

While much work has been done on the theology of individual books in the Bible, very few have attempted to develop a Petrine theology that utilizes both 1 and 2 Peter as well as Peter’s speeches in Acts. If, however, both the epistles and the discourse material in Acts stem from a common source, it stands to reason that one should be able to trace certain theological themes throughout and that these themes, when viewed in light of the Petrine material as a whole, would form a coherent theology. This essay examines the theme of prophecy in the two public sermons of Peter in Acts 2 and 3 and the two Petrine epistles. After examining the four units individually, this essay attempts to mold them into a “Petrine theology of prophecy” while also noting how this could potentially affect other areas of theology.

Key Words: Peter, Petrine theology, prophecy, theology of prophecy, Acts, 1 Peter, 2 Peter, Peter’s sermons

Author’s note: I am grateful for the comments and encouragement of Andreas J. Köstenberger and two anonymous BBR referees on an earlier draft of this article. Any errors remain my sole responsibility.

While extensive work has been done on the theology of 1 Peter, 2 Peter, and Acts as distinct units, very few have attempted to link the two major Petrine sermons from Acts with the two epistles in order to develop a coherent Petrine theology. Indeed, even those who argue that 1 and 2 Peter should be studied together see no reason to integrate the sermons in Acts into the equation, and the most comprehensive study to date of Peter’s discourses in Acts does not even view them as truly Petrine.1

But if the apostle Peter truly is behind the two epistles bearing his name as well as the sermons in Acts 2 and 3, as many evangelicals believe, one should be able to notice common themes in those works that can lead

to the development of a coherent Petrine theology.2 An examination of the epistles and sermons reveals that this is indeed the case. Acts 2, Acts 3, 1 Peter, and 2 Peter all evidence a common emphasis on the role and nature of prophecy, and this article will attempt to synthesize that material into a coherent “Petrine theology of prophecy...

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