Some Notes on Psalm 46 The Christian and the Atomic Age -- By: Roy L. Aldrich

Journal: Bibliotheca Sacra
Volume: BSAC 119:475 (Jul 1962)
Article: Some Notes on Psalm 46 The Christian and the Atomic Age
Author: Roy L. Aldrich


Some Notes on Psalm 46
The Christian and the Atomic Age

Roy L. Aldrich

[Roy L. Aldrich is President of Detroit Bible College, Detroit, Michigan, and Visiting Bible Lecturer at Dallas Theological Seminary.]

1 GOD is our refuge and strength, avery present help in trouble.

2 Therefore will not we fear, though the earth be removed, and though the mountains be carried into the midst of the sea;

3 Though the waters thereof roar and be troubled, though the mountains shake with the swelling thereof. Selah.

4 There is a river, the streams whereof shall make glad the city of God, the holy place of the tabernacles of the most high.

5 God is in the midst of her; she shall not be moved: God shall help her, and that right early.

6 The heathen raged, the kingdoms were moved: he uttered his voice, the earth melted.

7 The LORD of hosts is with us; the God of Jacob is our refuge. Selah.

8 Come, behold the works of the LORD, what desolations he hath made in the earth.

9 He maketh wars to cease unto the end of the earth; he breaketh the bow, and cutteth the spear in sunder; he burneth the chariot in the fire.

10 Be still, and know that I am God: I will be exalted among the heathen, I will be exalted in the earth.

11 The LORD of hosts is with us; the God of Jacob is our refuge. Selah.

The 46th Psalm was probably written to commemorate some great national testing and deliverance. Some think it celebrates the delivery of Jerusalem from Sennacherib when 185,000 Assyrians were slain in a single night (Isa 36–37). Prophetically the psalm looks forward to the final destruction of the enemies of Israel and the establishment of the

millennial kingdom. However, this psalm has a wonderful personal message of comfort to all of God’s people, especially in their trials. It is said that the 46th Psalm, together with the Wartburg Castle in which the Saxon king protected Luther, inspired him to write the great reformation hymn, “A Mighty Fortress.”

How true it is that God is our refuge and a “very present help in trouble.” Many will testify that their most blessed and intimate experience of the peace and presence of God came in the time of their greatest trial. But this psalm has a peculiar message of comfort and instruction for these days of world confusion and fear.

Its divisions are indicated by the word “selah,” which occurs at the end of verses three, seven, and eleven. The meaning of “selah” is...

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