The Unique Status of Jesus as the Divine Messiah: An Exegetical and Theological Analysis of Mark 1:1, 9-13 -- By: Dan Lioy

Journal: Conspectus
Volume: CONSPECTUS 03:1 (Mar 2007)
Article: The Unique Status of Jesus as the Divine Messiah: An Exegetical and Theological Analysis of Mark 1:1, 9-13
Author: Dan Lioy


The Unique Status of Jesus as the Divine Messiah:
An Exegetical and Theological Analysis of Mark 1:1, 9-13

Dan Lioy1

Abstract

The intent of this essay is to analyze Mark 1:1, 9–13 in order to elucidate the unique status of Jesus as the divine Messiah. An exegetical and theological examination of these verses indicates that with the advent of the Redeemer, God has initiated a new spiritual beginning for humanity. As the Son of God, Jesus enjoys a special and intimate relationship with the Father. Jesus is also fully and absolutely equal to the Father and the Spirit. Furthermore, Jesus, as the ideal Israelite and representative of the human race, completely devoted Himself to do the Father’s will, despite the fact that it would eventually cost the Messiah His own life. Even repeated attacks from Satan and the humiliation of the divine Saviour on the cross did not deter Him from fulfilling His preordained mission. In every episode, the Son, who enjoyed the Father’s approval and the Spirit’s abiding presence, proved Himself to be “God’s Chosen One” (John 1:33).2

1. The Beginning of the Good News (Mark 1:1)

The motivation for this essay stems from the chorus of protest among those within academia who reject the teaching of Scripture that Jesus alone is the true Redeemer and the only way to God. For instance, Killinger (2002:39, 52–53) dismisses John 14:6—in which Jesus declares Himself to be “the way and the truth and the life”—by maintaining that the fourth Gospel, along with the other Gospel accounts, is historically “semi-fictional”, “contrived”, and “unreliable”. Likewise, Killinger brushes aside Acts 4:12—wherein Peter announces that “salvation is found in no one else” but Jesus—by asserting that the entire book sets forth a “dubious ‘history’ of the early church”. Killinger represents a “cafeteria-style” approach to Christianity in which people choose those aspects of the religion they like and disregard those they find objectionable. In light of this situation, Jude 3 is correct in urging believers to “contend for the faith that the Lord has once for all entrusted to us”.

With that exhortation in mind, this journal article affirms the unique status of Jesus as the divine Messiah, a truth likewise emphasized in

You must have a subscription and be logged in to read the entire article.
Click here to subscribe
visitor : : uid: ()