The Victory Song Of Moses In Christological Perspective Within The Apocalypse Of John -- By: Martin Pohlmann

Journal: Conspectus
Volume: CONSPECTUS 14:1 (Sep 2012)
Article: The Victory Song Of Moses In Christological Perspective Within The Apocalypse Of John
Author: Martin Pohlmann


The Victory Song Of Moses In Christological Perspective Within The Apocalypse Of John

Martin Pohlmann1

Abstract

Christians typically seek to approach life from a biblical perspective. Within this biblical perspective, an apocalyptic view on life encourages them to experience the reality of a relationship with God in adverse conditions. With this in mind, this article focused on the biblical apocalyptic tradition found in Exodus chapter 15, later interpreted christologically in the Apocalypse of John chapter 15; the ‘victory song of Moses’, and the ‘victory song of Moses and the Lamb’. Literature on the dialogue between these two songs was researched, and the implications for suffering Christians were explored. Finally, this article demonstrated how Christians may be aware of the ‘secular’ onslaught on this ‘sacred’ perspective.

1. Orientation

Songs and singing are essential to the worship of God’s people, both in times of suffering and in times of celebration (Manson 2005:731). It is against this background that the songs of Exodus 15:1-18 and Revelation 15:3-7 are considered. Both the Exodus and the Apocalypse

are punctuated with worship songs to the God who rescues his people from perilous circumstances. Moses, leading a nation in obedience to God’s guidance, is able to overcome the greatest challenges—while the author of the Apocalypse, drawing inspiration from the Exodus narrative, observes how Jesus Christ leads his people to overcome with rejoicing.

The song in Revelation 15 is not a direct quotation of the song in Exodus 15. The first song contains five verses, while the second song contains eighteen. Yet, Revelation 15:32 attributes the song to Moses: ‘They held harps given them by God and sang the song of Moses the servant of God’ (NKJV). What is important for the purposes of this article is how the song of Moses is also attributed to Jesus: ‘And the song of the Lamb’. Pohlmann (2008:90) points out the following: ‘An interesting song is sung which does not directly quote from the song of Moses, but rather presents a Christ-centred interpretation (or application) of the old battle hymn.’

There is, further, a substantial amount of theological ‘translation’ between the two songs (...

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