A Biblical Model Of Mentoring With A Knowledge Management Perspective -- By: Alton Chua

Journal: Conspectus
Volume: CONSPECTUS 15:1 (Mar 2013)
Article: A Biblical Model Of Mentoring With A Knowledge Management Perspective
Author: Alton Chua


A Biblical Model Of Mentoring With A Knowledge Management Perspective

Alton Chua

and Pelham Lessing1

Abstract

The primary purpose of this paper is to develop a biblical model of mentoring with a knowledge management perspective. To this end, four research questions are submitted: (a) what are the components of a biblical model of mentoring with a knowledge management perspective? (b) What are the nature and types of knowledge imparted in a mentoring relationship? (c) What are the impediments to knowledge impartation in a mentoring relationship? (d) What knowledge management strategies can be used to overcome the impediments to knowledge impartation in a mentoring relationship? To address these problems, the Wesleyan quadrilateral approach of doing theology was used.

First, five major components of a biblical model of mentoring with a knowledge perspective can be identified. They are the mentor, the protégé, the knowledge to be imparted, the mentor-protégé relationship, and the Holy Spirit. Next, the nature of knowledge imparted can be conceptualised as explicit-tacit-implicit, declarative-procedural-causal, as well as human-social-structured. The types of knowledge imparted cover instruction, encouragement, and inspiration. Third, four

main impediments to knowledge impartation are the negative attributes of the mentor, the negative attributes of the protégé, the characteristics of the knowledge, and the arduous mentor-protégé relationship. Finally, knowledge management strategies to overcome the impediments to knowledge impartation in a mentoring relationship include mentor motivation, selection and training, a clear developmental path, and constant prayer for the protégé, and an organically-nurtured mentor-protégé relationship to promote trust between them.

1. Introduction

1.1. Background

The term mentor has its root in the world of Greek mythology. In Homer’s Odyssey, Mentor was a character entrusted with the task to tutor and guide Odysseus’ son, the young Telemachus (Daloz 1999:20). The concept of mentoring has since been extended to various fields including management and education. In the context of Christianity, mentoring has been defined as ‘a triadic relationship between mentor, mentoree and the Holy Spirit, where the mentoree can discover the already present action of God, intimacy with God, ultimate identity as a child of God and a unique voice for kingdom responsibility’ (Anderson and Reese 1999:12).

Even though the term mentor cannot be found in the scriptures, ...

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