Reconciling Evangelistic Methods With Worship Models A Consideration Of Apologetic Approaches In The Worship Framework -- By: Gregory Woodward

Journal: Journal for Baptist Theology & Ministry
Volume: JBTM 07:2 (Fall 2010)
Article: Reconciling Evangelistic Methods With Worship Models A Consideration Of Apologetic Approaches In The Worship Framework
Author: Gregory Woodward


Reconciling Evangelistic Methods With Worship Models
A Consideration Of Apologetic Approaches In The Worship Framework

Gregory Woodward

Dr. Woodward is Assistant Professor of Conducting, Chair of Church Music Ministries at New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary New Orleans, Louisiana

The following paper was originally presented at the Southwest Regional Evangelical Theological Society Meeting in the spring of 2011. Because I was a guest among scholarly theologians, I began the presentation with what I viewed to be appropriate delimitations.

Before I begin, a few delimitations are in order. I resonate with Stapert’s reluctance in presenting a book on the songs of the early church.1 Stapert explains that he is approaching the subject as one who would not be considered a specialist in the field of early worship practice and yet saw an obvious need for research in early worship practices. Likewise, C. S. Lewis warns his readers that he is not approaching his study on the Psalms from the standpoint of a theologian.2 So I too admit to you that I come to the topic of worship theology as one involved in training worship leaders, one holding music education degrees, and one who teaches a leadership class on the subject of worship at New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary but not as a theologian.

In terms of theological bias I bring to the subject, I was raised in a Southern Baptist worship setting with my primary formative years occurring in the 1980’s and 90’s. The glory of God was never questioned but not particularly emphasized as the primary focus of worship. Evangelistic meetings hold a prominent place in my childhood and adolescent memories of worship. I do not believe I ever sought to distinguish what was worship from what was evangelistic. As I moved from being a part-time worship leader to a full-time worship leader and youth pastor in 1999, I began to explore worship from a philosophical standpoint. In fact I have engaged in a decade long self-evaluation process in relationship to a philosophy of worship. This process began in earnest during a period of time when I worked under the leadership of the Dr. Eric Erskine,

pastor at First Baptist Church Havana, Fl. In many ways Eric introduced me to the Reformed perspective, which was an aspect of his training at Dallas Theological Seminary.

I will admit that I began to recognize, even at that time, that the Reformed tradition perhaps did a better job of emphasizing a theology of worship and particular worship forms that match Reformed theology than did the traditio...

You must have a subscription and be logged in to read the entire article.
Click here to subscribe
visitor : : uid: ()