Review Article: “A Theology Of Luke And Acts: God’s Promised Program Realized For All Nations” By Darrell L. Bock -- By: Gerald L. Stevens

Journal: Journal for Baptist Theology & Ministry
Volume: JBTM 10:2 (Fall 2013)
Article: Review Article: “A Theology Of Luke And Acts: God’s Promised Program Realized For All Nations” By Darrell L. Bock
Author: Gerald L. Stevens


Review Article: “A Theology Of Luke And Acts: God’s Promised Program Realized For All Nations” By Darrell L. Bock

Gerald L. Stevens

Gerald L. Stevens is Professor of New Testament and Greek at New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary.

A Theology of Luke and Acts: God’s Promised Program Realized for All Nations. By Darrell L. Bock. Biblical Theology of the New Testament. Edited by Andreas J. Köstenberger. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2012. 496 pages. Hardback, $39.99.

Introduction

Biblical Theology of the New Testament is a series of eight biblical theology volumes surveying recent scholarship, covering introductory issues, providing a thematic commentary, pointing out individual themes, and reflecting on canonical integration. The series assumes the continuum of a salvation-historical story centered in Christ to be precipitated out of biblical texts. The attempt is to be context sensitive to historical settings while establishing these themes. Bock did his original dissertation study at the University of Aberdeen in Luke-Acts focused on Christology, and has been writing volumes in Luke and Acts over the decades.

Content

Bock follows the general pattern for this series. Each chapter begins with a selected, current bibliography that is a useful resource for students who will engage in further research. Book contents are broken into three parts of introduction, themes, and canon, but these parts receive uneven treatment in the number of pages (70, 330, 17). The opening and closing parts and Bock’s conclusion receive attention in this article first. Then we overview strengths, missed opportunities, and weaknesses.

The opening part on introductory matters is perfunctory (chapters 1-4). The series requires covering introductory matters, but since we already have Bock’s own previous publications on Luke and Acts, this material is redundant. The closing part on the canon briefly surveys the process of canonization and then Luke’s distinctive contribution to the canon (chapter 22). Much of Jesus’ teaching beyond parables, Bock points out, is uniquely Lukan. A table of references 74 75

lays out this contribution (435). The material shows Luke’s pastoral concern, resurrection-ascension as vindication theme, role of the Holy Spirit, miracles unique to Luke, outreach to the nations, the hub role of certain churches, Paul’s missionary journeys, understanding of the early kerygma, emphasis on women and the poor, the impact of repentance on human relationships, and a distinctive highlight on prayer. Bock t...

You must have a subscription and be logged in to read the entire article.
Click here to subscribe
visitor : : uid: ()