The Implications Of William Foxwell Albright’s Assertion Of The Empirico Logical Mentality Of Hebraic Thinking For A Christian Apologetic -- By: James W. Bryant

Journal: Journal of Christian Apologetics
Volume: JCA 01:2 (Winter 1997)
Article: The Implications Of William Foxwell Albright’s Assertion Of The Empirico Logical Mentality Of Hebraic Thinking For A Christian Apologetic
Author: James W. Bryant


The Implications Of William Foxwell Albright’s Assertion Of The Empirico Logical Mentality Of Hebraic Thinking For A Christian Apologetic

James W. Bryant1

A Brief Biographical Sketch of W. F. Albright

Born in Coquimbo, Chile, on May 24, 1891, he was the son of Rev. and Mrs. Wilbur F. Albright, Methodist missionaries in Chile. Albright spent his childhood in the small Chilean city of La Serena and later attended a small private British school in Antofagasta. His mother directed a school which Albright attended after Antofagasta. He read history and theology at home, becoming interested in archaeology and biblical antiquities at the age of eight. In his early teens, his family returned to Iowa and moved from one parsonage to another as his father pastored the various churches. His long visits with his grandparents, who owned many books, offered Albright an opportunity to become an avid reader.

At sixteen years of age he entered the preparatory school attached to what was then Upper Iowa University at Fayette. There he began to study Latin, Greek, Hebrew, and Assyrian, as well as history and related subjects. In five years he had worked his way through preparatory school and college, being awarded the A.B. degree in 1912. He taught high school for a year and then applied for and received a fellowship at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. He received his Ph.D. degree and remained at the university in a Johnston Scholar Fellowship for Research.

During World War 1, Albright was drafted into the armed services. After the war, he spent a year in Jerusalem (1919–1920) on a Thayer Fellowship at the American School of Oriental Research where he studied modem Arabic and Hebrew. In 1920 he was made Acting Director of the school, and Director in 1921. During the following eight years Albright directed excavations at Gibeah, Tell Beit Mirsim, Bethel, sites in biblical Moab, and Petra. He assisted in the excavation of Shiloh and Bethzur. He returned to Johns Hopkins in 1919 to assume the W.W. Spence Chair of Semitic Languages, which he occupied for about thirty years. Shortly before 1959 he became a research professor at the Jewish Theological Seminary in New York City. Albright published 937 books and articles, several of which were published posthumously. He is the scholar who first recognized in 1937 the value and early date of the Nash Papyrus, dating it in the early second century B.C. He was the authority who first gave the date of 100-

150 B.C. to the Isaiah A scroll of the Dead Sea Scrolls. He remained a popular lecturer in the fields of archaeology and Semitic languages until his death in 1971.

Lucian Lev...
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