Book Reviews -- By: Anonymous

Journal: Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society
Volume: JETS 51:1 (Mar 2008)
Article: Book Reviews
Author: Anonymous


Book Reviews

Invitation to Biblical Hebrew: A Beginning Grammar. By Russell T. Fuller and Kyoungwon Choi. Invitation to Theological Studies Series. Grand Rapids: Kregel, 2006, xviii + 364 pp., $49.99. Invitation to Biblical Hebrew: A Beginning GrammarWorkbook. By Russell T. Fuller and Kyoungwon Choi. Invitation to Theological Studies Series. Grand Rapids: Kregel, 2006, xi + 335 pp., $29.99. Invitation to Biblical Hebrew: A Beginning GrammarClassroom DVDs. By Russell T. Fuller and Kyoungwon Choi. Invitation to Theological Studies Series. Grand Rapids: Kregel, 2006, 6 discs, $49.99.

Invitation to Biblical Hebrew adopts a deductive approach to teaching biblical Hebrew (BH) by focusing on phonology and then morphology. The grammar, workbook, and DVDs represent what Fuller and Choi think students should master in two semesters, equipping them to translate simple prose. Admitting BH cannot be learned in a year, they plan to offer an intermediate book on syntax, comprising a second year of Hebrew. Through this “layered” approach to teaching BH that Fuller employs at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, the authors hope students will know BH well enough to use it in Christian ministry.

The authors’ approach focuses on rules that are explained and demonstrated in the various chapters. Students imitate the forms through exercises and repeat the material until it is thoroughly engrained in their memory. Sometimes this involves memorization of paradigms, but more often the authors try to ease the burden of learning BH by expecting memorization of rules of syllabification, vowel reduction, assimilation of weak letters, and vowel patterns of verbs.

The plan of the book is as follows. Chapters 1–6 deal strictly with phonology, leading to the “heart of the grammar,” namely four rules of vocalization in Proto-Hebrew that lead to five rules of syllables in BH. Exercises at this level ask students to apply these rules to convert BH words into Proto-Hebrew and vice versa. The rest of the book builds on this foundation and is devoted to morphology, first of nouns and adjectives (chaps. 10–16); then the strong verb in all stems (chaps. 17–28); then various classes of weak verbs (chaps. 29–38). Chapters typically end with review questions, a vocabulary list, morphological drills, and translation sentences. Only the last two chapters assign a passage for translation (Gen 20:1–8 and 9–18). The book ends with thirty-four pages of charts; a comprehensive vocabulary list; subject index; some review; and sixteen pages of color-coded verb charts.

The grammar is carefully planned and executed. It is ...

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