Jewish Intertestamental And Early Rabbinic Literature: An Annotated Bibliographic Resource Updated (Part 2) -- By: David W. Chapman

Journal: Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society
Volume: JETS 55:3 (Sep 2012)
Article: Jewish Intertestamental And Early Rabbinic Literature: An Annotated Bibliographic Resource Updated (Part 2)
Author: David W. Chapman


Jewish Intertestamental And Early Rabbinic Literature: An Annotated Bibliographic Resource Updated (Part 2)

David W. Chapman

and Andreas J. Köstenberger

David Chapman is associate professor of New Testament and Archaeology at Covenant Theological Seminary, 12330 Conway Road, St. Louis, MO 63141. Andreas Köstenberger is senior research professor of New Testament and Biblical Theology at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary, 120 S. Wingate St., Wake Forest, NC 27587.

5. Dead Sea Scrolls

While the Dead Sea Scrolls are generally associated with Qumran, properly they also cover other discoveries such as those at Naḥal Ḥever, Murabba͑at and Masada. The Qumran finds involve mss from the third century bc through the first century ad. The finds at Naḥal Ḥever and Murabba͑at include documents from the time of the Bar Kokhba revolt (ad 132-135), while Masada involves Jewish scrolls from the time leading up to the Roman conquest (ad 73) and subsequent Roman documents. The non-literary documentary papyri (e.g. wills, deeds of sale, marriage documents, etc.) are not covered below.

There are many theories about the origins of the Qumran DSS, but the reigning scholarly consensus views the 11 caves near the Qumran settlement as containing literary remains of the Qumran sect (generally identified with the Essenes). The documents include biblical and non-biblical materials, the latter frequently, though somewhat artificially, divided into sectarian and non-sectarian literature. Scholars recognized early the connection between the Qumran DSS and the medieval “Damascus Document” (= CD) from the Cairo Genizah, copies of which are also known from Qumran. Qumran scrolls are cited by cave number (e.g. 11Q = cave 11) along with a document number (e.g. 11Q19) or title (e.g. 11QTemple); this is followed by fragment, column, and line numbers (column numbers are often in Roman numerals; e.g. 4QpNah 3-4 i 6 = Pesher Nahum from Cave 4, fragments 3 and 4, column 1, line 6).

Bibliography:

Tov, Emanuel. Revised Lists of the Texts from the Judaean Desert. Leiden/Boston: Brill, 2010. Includes publication data and photograph reference numbers. Revision of list published in DJD 39 (from 2002), though DJD 39 remains useful for other lists it contains.

Fitzmyer, Joseph A. A Guide to the Dead Sea Scrolls and Related Literature. Rev. and exp. ed. Studies in the Dead Sea Scrolls and Related Literature. Grand Ra...

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