The Glory Of God In The Book Of Jude: A Defense Of Ryrie’s Third Point In The “Sine Qua Non” Of Dispensationalism -- By: Dan Wiley

Journal: Journal of Ministry and Theology
Volume: JMAT 22:1 (Spring 2018)
Article: The Glory Of God In The Book Of Jude: A Defense Of Ryrie’s Third Point In The “Sine Qua Non” Of Dispensationalism
Author: Dan Wiley


The Glory Of God In The Book Of Jude: A Defense Of Ryrie’s Third Point In The “Sine Qua Non” Of Dispensationalism

Dan Wiley

In 1965, Charles Caldwell Ryrie published Dispensationalism Today, a text which is arguably the most significant contribution to the development of dispensationalism in the twentieth century.2 In this important work, one written as an apologetic for dispensational thought,3 Ryrie presents (among other things) his case for the “sine qua non” of dispensationalism, or the absolute essentials of dispensationalism, which Ryrie identifies as (1) a distinction between Israel and the church, (2) the consistent use of literal

hermeneutics, and (3) the glory of God as the unifying theme of Scripture and history.4

Since the publication of Dispensationalism Today, both Ryrie’s supporters and opponents have written numerous books and articles on the legitimacy of Ryrie’s sine qua non as the acid test for dispensationalism.5 However, the final point, that of God’s glory as the unifying theme of Scripture and history, has received a greater amount of rejection as a valid indicator of dispensationalism.6 At first glance, such rejection appears valid. Is the glory of God too broad to identify as the unifying theme of Scripture and history? How can Ryrie claim the glory of God as a distinguishing mark of dispensationalism when non-dispensationalists also value the glory of God? Do other possible unifying themes better fit the specifics of dispensationalist thinking? These criticisms have led some dispensationalists to dismiss the third point as a valid indicator of dispensationalism,7 while others seek to define dispensationalism in different terms altogether.8

In Dispensationalism Today, Ryrie offers three defenses of his third point: (1) Scripture states that salvation is to the glory of God; (2) God has a plan for the angels that is not soteriological; and (3) God’s kingdom program is not confined to salvific purposes.9 Although scholars have criticized Ryrie’s third point, there exists very little academic writing interacting with Ryrie’s defense of his third point and its biblical warra...

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