A Critique Of Keith A. Fournier’s A House United? Evangelicals and Catholics Together: A Winning Alliance for the 21st Century -- By: Robert N. Wilkin

Journal: Journal of the Grace Evangelical Society
Volume: JOTGES 08:1 (Spring 1995)
Article: A Critique Of Keith A. Fournier’s A House United? Evangelicals and Catholics Together: A Winning Alliance for the 21st Century
Author: Robert N. Wilkin


A Critique Of Keith A. Fournier’s
A House United? Evangelicals and Catholics Together: A Winning Alliance for the 21st Century1

Robert N. Wilkin

Executive Director
Grace Evangelical Society
Irving, TX

I. Introduction

I am very interested in this book for a number of reasons. First, the man who assisted in the writing of this book, Bill Watkins, was my contemporary in seminary. Second, recently at a meeting of Bible scholars in Chicago, Bill and I and had a brief conversation about the book. Third, the issue which this book addresses is vital to the clear proclamation of the Gospel. Fourth, this issue is now receiving widespread attention. This is due, in part, to the release in 1992 of a statement entitled “Evangelicals and Catholics Together: The Christian Mission in the Third Millennium” (which Fournier includes in full in the appendix). Fifth, and most significant, I believe this book addresses a very important Gospel issue.

The book begins in an arresting way: “I am a Christian. I am a Catholic Christian. I am an evangelical Catholic Christian” (p. 19). A little later, on the same page, Fournier admits that many Protestant Christians2 have

a hard time accepting those claims because of their view of the Gospel.3

The critique to follow will attempt to demonstrate that Fournier has not proved that he is an evangelical Christian. However, before beginning this critique, we should note some of the book’s strong points.

The title accurately describes the contents of the book, something which is very helpful to the reader. The cover is attractive. There is an appendix giving the complete 1992 statement entitled, B.BXSU||Evangelicals and Catholics Together: The Christian Mission in the Third Millennium.” Since that document directly relates to the discussion of whether a person can be born again by believing the gospel of Roman Catholicism,4 it is very helpful to have it included. The tone of the book is irenic. Fournier comes across as a likable person.

The reports in the book of the author’s efforts on behalf of the Pro-Life Movement are impressive, as are his strong commitment to conservative morality and his drive to make a difference with his life.

The impression the author leaves is that he is someone who might read this review and give it serious consideration. Beyond that, I hope that many Catholics will read and ...

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