A Review Of Matthew C. Hoskinson’s “Assurance Of Salvation: Implications Of A New Testament Theology Of Hope” -- By: Robert N. Wilkin

Journal: Journal of the Grace Evangelical Society
Volume: JOTGES 32:63 (Autumn 2019)
Article: A Review Of Matthew C. Hoskinson’s “Assurance Of Salvation: Implications Of A New Testament Theology Of Hope”
Author: Robert N. Wilkin


A Review Of Matthew C. Hoskinson’s “Assurance Of Salvation: Implications Of A New Testament Theology Of Hope”

Robert N. Wilkin

I. Introduction

There have not been many books written on assurance of salvation. Assurance of Salvation (hereafter AOS) is a revised version of Hoskinson’s 2005 doctoral dissertation at Bob Jones University.1

Most of AOS fails to examine NT texts dealing with assurance of salvation, with Hoskinson focusing primarily on “a New Testament Theology of Hope.”2

However, hope in the NT rarely refers to assurance of everlasting life. Therefore, in this review I will focus primarily on chapter 2, “Contemporary Views on Assurance.”3

II. Two Assurance Views Which Hoskinson Rejects: Free Grace And Arminian

Hoskinson coins expressions for what he considers to be the three main views of assurance of salvation today. He calls them “the present only view”4 (i.e., Arminian), “the time of conversion view”5 (i.e., Free Grace), and “the composite view”6 (i.e., Reformed Lordship Salvation).

A. The Present Only View (Arminian)

Hoskinson’s discussion of the present only view is a bit misleading. He suggests that Arminians are sure they are saved now, but are unsure that they will remain saved: “adherents of this position affirm the possibility of assurance of only present salvation, denying that believers can have assurance of final salvation.”7

He also says that they teach that, “All believers may enjoy a present assurance of their present salvation” and that “While assurance of present salvation is possible, assurance of final salvation is not.”8

This is misleading because Arminians, like Calvinists, cannot be sure that they are saved now or that they will be saved at the end of their lives. (And most Calvinists, like Hoskinson, believe it is impossible to be sure of “final salvation.”) Present certainty would mean that an Arminian was sure he was currently doing enough good works and avoiding enough bad works to qualify for salvation if he died. Since there is no Biblical passage explaining how to quantify one’s good an...

You must have a subscription and be logged in to read the entire article.
Click here to subscribe
visitor : : uid: ()