The Image Of God In Humanity: Fleshing Out The Bare Bones Of Marital Oneness -- By: Noelle Z. Lowry

Journal: Priscilla Papers
Volume: PP 26:4 (Autumn 2012)
Article: The Image Of God In Humanity: Fleshing Out The Bare Bones Of Marital Oneness
Author: Noelle Z. Lowry


The Image Of God In Humanity:
Fleshing Out The Bare Bones Of Marital Oneness

Noelle Z. Lowry

Noelle Z. Lowry holds a BA in psychology from Taylor University and an MA in counseling from Regent University, and is currently a PhD student in psychology at Walden University. She and her husband, Keith, have been married for eighteen years and reside in the Virginia Beach area, where both of them work in a private-practice Christian counseling setting. Together, they share in the blessing of raising five children, ranging in age from toddler to teen.

Introduction

A closer discernment of biblical influence on spousal relationships can help humanity model pervasively the image of God. In his divine image, God created “man” both male and female (Gen 1:27). A new fleshing out of the bare bones of marital oneness can foster health within Christian marriages by exploring biblical matrimonial ideals. Based on the example of the Trinity, the egalitarian stance of reciprocal mutual submission displayed through marital oneness more fully reflects the imago Dei.

Identification Of Concepts Relating To Marriage

The image of God in humanity is reflected in Adam and Eve’s sinless state and is the true nature both for which and in which all of humankind was created.1 In his divine image, God created “man” both male and female (Gen 1:27). Sadly, after the fall, the perfection of their oneness bond and the relationship they experienced with God were destroyed.2 Yet, even in light of their post-fall circumstances, the truth and essence of God’s image in humans remained intact.

The traditional male position of domination, contrasting with the female’s as the subordinate mate, bestows an incorrect rendering of God’s intention for unity within marriage.3 As a result, marriage is frequently perceived as an antiquated and parochial contract as opposed to a relevant and indispensable covenant relationship between equals. Further obfuscating matters, a marriage including a “Christian man” and a “Christian woman” does not automatically comprise a “Christian marriage”; all too often, “Earthly marriage as it is now lived out is a bad copy of a good original.”4 False impressions prevail over proper biblical relationships. In a survey of 750 readers, Christianity Today found a substantial 89 percent expressed “a lot of confusion about male and female roles in the Christian world today.”

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