An Examination Of Jesus’s View Of Women Through Three Intercalations In The Gospel Of Mark -- By: David E. Malick

Journal: Priscilla Papers
Volume: PP 27:3 (Summer 2013)
Article: An Examination Of Jesus’s View Of Women Through Three Intercalations In The Gospel Of Mark
Author: David E. Malick


An Examination Of Jesus’s View Of Women Through Three Intercalations In The Gospel Of Mark

David E. Malick

David E. Malick has a ThM and completed PhD coursework at Dallas Theological Seminary. He was an assistant professor at Dallas Theological Seminary and Southeastern Bible College in Birmingham, Alabama. He now practices law at RichardsonClement PC and continues to teach the Scriptures at Christ the King Anglican Church in Birmingham, Alabama.

Introduction

A basic tenet in the hermeneutics of theology is to build a doctrine upon the clearer, or less disputed, passages and then interpret the more difficult passages in light of the clearer passages.1

However, in gender studies, the ground is often first broken in the rough terrain of 1 Timothy 2, 1 Corinthians 11 and 14, or with the household codes of Ephesians 5-6, Colossians 3, and 1 Peter 2-3. This study will examine three passages involving women in Mark’s gospel—in Mark 3, 5, and 14—all of which are undisputed in terms of significant lexicography, grammar, or relevant gender theology. As clearer passages, they form part of a greater foundation to the theology of gender studies.

The message of these passages is amplified through the literary technique known as intercalation,2 where a first story is begun, then interrupted by a second, inner, story told to its conclusion,3 whereupon the first story resumes and is told to its completion.4

This method of storytelling invites the reader to compare and contrast the outer and inner stories,5 resulting in a new story outcome that includes, but also transcends, the component stories.6 A key to interpreting an intercalation is to recognize the way in which the writer has brought the two stories together, and yet holds them apart, to produce an interpretation of the stories.7 The three Marcan intercalations we will examine involve women, two of whom are anonymous, namely, Jesus’s mother in Mark 3

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