A Sermon Preached At The Ordination Of An Elder And Deacons In A Baptized Congregation In London -- By: Nehemiah Coxe

Journal: Reformed Baptist Theological Review
Volume: RBTR 01:1 (Jan 2004)
Article: A Sermon Preached At The Ordination Of An Elder And Deacons In A Baptized Congregation In London
Author: Nehemiah Coxe


A Sermon Preached At The Ordination Of An Elder And Deacons In A Baptized Congregation In London

Nehemiah Coxe1

Who is sufficient for these things? 2 Cor. 2:16.

Titus 1:5

For this reason I left you in Crete, that you should set in order the things that are lacking, and appoint elders in every city as I commanded you.

The general design and scope of these words is obvious to the observation of every one that reads them. The great apostle of the Gentiles had with good success labored in preaching the Gospel to the Cretans; and being himself removed from them, after he had as a wise master-builder laid the foundation of many churches of Christians in Crete, he left Titus among them to build thereupon; and while he was resident there, Paul sends this Epistle to him, to remind him of that service for Christ in His churches that he had left upon his hands; whereby he does not only quicken him to his work, but also furnishes him with full and clear directions for the right management thereof.

In the account that our text gives of the reason for which Paul left Titus in Crete; the service which he was there to be employed in is set down.

1. In more general and comprehensive terms: “That you should set in order the things that are lacking.”

2. In a more particular account of one special charge left upon him: “and appoint elders in every city as I commanded you.”

That which we have to do in the first place is briefly to open to you what needs explication in the words.

The Greek word ἐπιδιορθώσῃ, which is rendered “set in order,” is nowhere else used in the New Testament, nor in the Version of the Old by the Septuagint that I can find. Divers learned interpreters do here

render it by corrigas: “that you should correct”; and Erasmus in his Notes, frames a word more expressive of its emphasis, supercorrigas, which imports to correct with accuracy and exactness; as one that goes over a work again; that he may be sure to leave no blemish upon it, or defect in it. Some understand this part of Titus’ charge to respect the correction of the manners of the Cretans by reproof and sound doctrine, and with this sense the Arabic Version fully concurs, Ut res vitiosas corrigas: “That you should correct the things that are faulty”; and it is evident in the sequel of the Epistle, that this was one part of his work. But I conceive this is ...

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