Searching For The Second Adam: Typological Connections Between Adam, Joseph, Mordecai, And Daniel -- By: Peter J. Link, Jr.

Journal: Southern Baptist Journal of Theology
Volume: SBJT 21:1 (Spring 2017)
Article: Searching For The Second Adam: Typological Connections Between Adam, Joseph, Mordecai, And Daniel
Author: Peter J. Link, Jr.


Searching For The Second Adam: Typological Connections Between Adam, Joseph, Mordecai, And Daniel

Peter J. Link, Jr.

and

Matthew Y. Emerson

Peter J. Link, Jr. is the Chair and Assistant Professor of Christian Studies at Charleston Southern University, Charleston, South Carolina. He earned his PhD in Biblical Studies in Old Testament and Hebrew from Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary. His dissertation provided a Composition Criticism of Deuteronomy 28:69-30:20. Dr. Link has contributed to a number of book reviews for the Southeastern Theological Review.

Matthew Y. Emerson is the Dickinson Chair of Religion and Assistant Professor of Religion at Oklahoma Baptist University, Shawnee, Oklahoma. He earned his PhD in Biblical Theology at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary. He is the author of Christ and the New Creation (Wipf & Stock, 2013) and Between the Cross and the Throne (Lexham, 2015), along with a number of essays and articles. Matt is also the co-editor of the Journal of Baptist Studies, and, along with R. Lucas Stamps and Christopher Morgan, the co-editor of a forthcoming volume on Baptist catholicity (B&H Academic). Dr. Emerson serves alongside Luke Stamps as the Executive Director of the Center for Baptist Renewal (centerforbaptistrenewal.com). Matt is married to Alicia and together they have five beautiful daughters.

Introduction

Those who champion orthodoxy rightly eschew doctrinal deviations in favor of proven, tested theological conclusions, but also demand that each new generation of Christian thinkers read the Scriptures afresh. Conservative theologians live, readily and occasionally happily, in such a tension. It is, after all, part of what it means to receive, maintain and pass on the faith. While the complexity of this process in practice may be “new” to those just beginning theological reflection, such calibrated newness that faithfully reclaims the old is a feature also found within the biblical text.

Specifically, the Pentateuch’s claim that one must not add to or take away from Moses’ words requires a biblical author to create that which is new and yet not new. We might call this a developing continuity between the Pentateuch and subsequent biblical reflection on Moses’ writing.1 Part of what it means to be a biblical author, in other words, is to receive, maintain and pass on the faith in the very act of composition and canonization. In composition, the author forms a whole book that shares the traits of cohes...

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