Review of Waldron, The End Times Made Simple: How Could Everybody be so wrong about Biblical Prophecy -- By: Noel Woodbridge

Journal: Conspectus
Volume: CONSPECTUS 16:1 (Sep 2013)
Article: Review of Waldron, The End Times Made Simple: How Could Everybody be so wrong about Biblical Prophecy
Author: Noel Woodbridge


Review of Waldron, The End Times Made Simple: How Could Everybody be so wrong about Biblical Prophecy

Noel Woodbridge1

Waldron SE 2008. The end times made simple: how could everybody be so wrong about biblical prophecy. New York: Calvary Press.

1. Introduction To The Author And The Book

Solid Ground Books (2013) provides the following information about the author of the book, Samuel Waldron:

Dr. Sam Waldron serves as the Professor of Systematic Theology at the Midwest Center for Theological Studies. This is an institution dedicated to the training of God’s servants for both the vocational pastorate and effective service to the Lord Christ in other vocations. Prior to moving to Kentucky to pursue his doctorate at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky, he was a pastor of the Reformed Baptist Church of Grand Rapids from 1977 to 2001. He is the author of numerous books and pamphlets including A Modern Exposition of the 1689 Baptist Confession of Faith.

The introduction to the book below includes its background setting, its eschatological position and a synopsis of the book.

Nowadays there is much confusion in the field of eschatology. On the one hand, believers are being advised to ‘follow the unbiblical, complex and bizarre scheme of Dispensationalism with its “Secret Rapture,” political Anti-Christ and worldly Millennium’ (WTS Books 2013).

On the other hand, the ‘full preterists’ inform us ‘that all biblical prophecy has been fulfilled’, and they say that we ought not to expect Christ to descend from the sky in judgment and triumph. However, in his book, The end times made simple, Waldron claims that both of these end-time schemes are incorrect and that the Bible teaching on the end-times is actually quite straightforward (WTS Books 2013).

Although he does not state it explicitly, Waldron holds an amillennialist position. One of the main differences between amillennialism and premillennialism revolves around the question as to ‘whether the thousand years of Revelation 20:1-6 is present or future’ (Waymeyer 2008). He elaborates as follows: ‘according to the amillennial interpretation, this thousand-year period consists of the present age which extends from the first coming of Christ to His second coming. In contrast, premillennialism teaches that the thousand years of Revelation 20 is future and will take place immediately after the second coming’ (Waymeyer 2008).

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